Legendary Peru


Discover the breathtaking wonders of the Andes and Machu Picchu's enigmatic ruins during this tour which features a native ceremony in the beautiful Sacred Valley, lunch in the home of a Cuzco family, and time with the top-hatted Uros people of Lake Titicaca.

Starting at: $4,749 * Including airfare, airline taxes & departure fees Make a Reservation Ask Us A Question or Call 855-330-1542
 The reed islands of the Uros people on Lake Titicaca  The World Heritage site of Machu Picchu  An Andean woman walks across a ridge near Chinchero, Peru. Credit: Christopher Newman  Historic Sanctuary of Machu Picchu  The site of Ollantaytambo in the Sacred Valley  An amazing view of Machu Picchu  Pisac ruins in the Sacred Valley  Exploring the site of Machu Picchu in Peru  Terraced landscape of Písac in the Sacred Valley  The historic city center of Cuzco in Peru  Quechua woman out for an afternoon stroll. Credit: Lola Akinmade  Uros women standing on a reed island on Lake Titicaca  The floating island of Los Uros on Lake Titicaca
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Tour Details

TOUR BROCHURE

WHAT OUR TRAVELERS SAY

This was a trip of a lifetime for me. Every detail was anticipated and taken care of, the pace was perfect, the sites and cities visited were just right. Our tour director was engaging and accommodating. I will definitely look to Smithsonian Journeys for my next travel adventure! 


Cecile R.

This superior tour goes way beyond the requisite Machu Picchu stop, by introducing you to the complexity of Peruvian history, the breadth of Inca sites and architecture, Peruvian culture and art, and the issues facing Peru today. Fantastic educational experience! 


Jo-Anne B.

Machu Picchu has been on my bucket list for many years. The entire area is a magical, mystical experience and actually being there did not disappoint. The Legendary Peru tour was an educational experience and exposed me to many cultures, practices, great ruins and a history of the country. 


Al A.

We were surprised at how much activity was packed into our 10 day trip. It certainly provided us with great insight into life in Peru today along with the historical roots of today's Peruvian peoples. 


Laura L.

JOURNEYS DISPATCHES

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Experts

Bill Sapp

Bill Sapp

Mar 16 - 26, 2015; Nov 23 - Dec 3, 2015

Bill Sapp is an archaeologist with special expertise in the Andes. He has been leading archaeological and cultural tours of Peru for more than a decade and is an expert in the Inca sites of Machu Picchu and the Machu Picchu Sanctuary, the Sacred Valley, and other sites located in and around Cuzco. Bill serves as a director for the non-profit corporation Conservation Volunteers International Program, where he organizes and leads groups of volunteers who work with the Peruvian Cultural Ministry to maintain and preserve Inca ruins in the Machu Picchu Sanctuary. He also works with the Peruvian Ministry of the Environment to help maintain biodiversity within the Sanctuary. Bill received his Ph.D. in anthropology from UCLA, where his doctoral dissertation documented his excavations at Cabur, a country palace located on Peru’s north coast. He also excavated at the Chimú administrative center of Algarrobal de Moro and the Lambayeque/ Chimú administrative center at Farfán. Dr. Sapp teaches part-time at California State University San Bernardino, where his courses include South American archaeology, an introduction to world civilizations, and an archaeological field school co-sponsored by the U.S. Forest Service and the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians. He also serves as an archaeologist for the U.S. Forest Service and as a tribal liaison between the U.S. government and 11 federally recognized Indian tribes.

David Scott Palmer

David Scott Palmer

Apr 20 - 30, 2015

David Scott Palmer is Boston University’'s Founding Director of the Latin American Studies Program and Professor Emeritus of International Relations and Political Science. Before joining the Boston University faculty, he served as Chair of Latin American and Caribbean Studies and Associate Dean of Area Studies at the U.S. State Department Foreign Service Institute. Over the years, he has traveled widely throughout Central America and Panama. His experience in the region includes public diplomacy lecture tours in each of the countries and assessments of their diplomatic services for the U.N. Development Program (UNDP). He has also taught seminars at the Latin American Social Science Faculty (FLACSO) of Costa Rica and served on the Latin American Studies Association (LASA) Observer Mission at the Central American Presidents negotiations in San José (which produced the Arias Peace Plan, for which Costa Rican President Oscar Arias was awarded the Nobel Prize. In addition, he was invited to give presentations in Panama in preparation for the final definitive handover of the Canal, and made a recent passage through this early 20th century engineering marvel.

Anita Cook

Anita Cook

Sep 28 - Oct 8, 2015

Anita G. Cook is an archaeologist specializing in the Central Andes with over 37 years of research in the region. She has conducted archaeological tours in the Andes since 1987. She currently teaches at The Catholic University of America in Washington DC. She has been visiting Professor of Anthropology at the National University of San Cristóbal de Huamanga, Ayacucho, Peru and served as Research Associate in the Department of Anthropology at the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution. Dr. Cook received Municipal Honorary Recognition and a Medal for defending and preserving the site of Conchopata-in Ayacucho, Peru. As director of the Lower Ica Valley Archaeological Project and co-director of the Conchopata Archaeological Project her research focuses on the emergence of early Andean States and empires in particular the Wari and Tiwnaku predecessors of the Incas with a particular focus on material culture, the visual arts, and iconography.

Her research has been internationally recognized through grant and fellowship awards including: the Fulbright Commission for field research; National Endowment for the Humanities, an in residence fellowship and Summer Research grants from Dumbarton Oaks, Harvard University; and another in residence Ailsa Mellon Bruce Senior Fellowship, Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, The National Gallery of Art and most recently with the Cleveland Museum of Art.

Dr. Cook is the author of Ritual Sacrifice in Ancient Peru, edited by Elizabeth Benson and Anita Cook (2001) and Wari y Tiwanaku: entre el estilo y la imagen (1994), and numerous articles. She has been a consultant for national and international museum exhibits, research seminars and sponsored research programs. In addition, she is active in conservation efforts to protect threatened cultural remains in Andean South America and is a founding member of the Latin American and Latino Program of The Catholic University of America.