Legendary Peru


Discover the breathtaking wonders of the Andes and Machu Picchu's enigmatic ruins during this tour which features a native ceremony in the beautiful Sacred Valley, lunch in the home of a Cuzco family, and time with the top-hatted Uros people of Lake Titicaca.

Starting at: $4,749 * Including airfare, airline taxes & departure fees Make a Reservation Ask Us A Question or Call 855-330-1542
 The reed islands of the Uros people on Lake Titicaca  The World Heritage site of Machu Picchu  An Andean woman walks across a ridge near Chinchero, Peru. Credit: Christopher Newman  Historic Sanctuary of Machu Picchu  The site of Ollantaytambo in the Sacred Valley  An amazing view of Machu Picchu  Pisac ruins in the Sacred Valley  Exploring the site of Machu Picchu in Peru  Terraced landscape of Písac in the Sacred Valley  The historic city center of Cuzco in Peru  Quechua woman out for an afternoon stroll. Credit: Lola Akinmade  Uros women standing on a reed island on Lake Titicaca  The floating island of Los Uros on Lake Titicaca
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Tour Details

TOUR BROCHURE

WHAT OUR TRAVELERS SAY

This was a trip of a lifetime for me. Every detail was anticipated and taken care of, the pace was perfect, the sites and cities visited were just right. Our tour director was engaging and accommodating. I will definitely look to Smithsonian Journeys for my next travel adventure! 


Cecile R.

This superior tour goes way beyond the requisite Machu Picchu stop, by introducing you to the complexity of Peruvian history, the breadth of Inca sites and architecture, Peruvian culture and art, and the issues facing Peru today. Fantastic educational experience! 


Jo-Anne B.

Machu Picchu has been on my bucket list for many years. The entire area is a magical, mystical experience and actually being there did not disappoint. The Legendary Peru tour was an educational experience and exposed me to many cultures, practices, great ruins and a history of the country. 


Al A.

We were surprised at how much activity was packed into our 10 day trip. It certainly provided us with great insight into life in Peru today along with the historical roots of today's Peruvian peoples. 


Laura L.

JOURNEYS DISPATCHES

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Experts

Dr. Sabine Hyland

Dr. Sabine Hyland

Sep 21 - Oct 1, 2015; Mar 14 - 24, 2016

Sabine Hyland received her B.A. in Anthropology from Cornell University and her M.Phil. and Ph.D. in Anthropology from Yale University, and is a Reader in Social Anthropology at St. Andrews University. A veteran scholar of the Andes, Hyland has won fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Science Foundation, and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Her first book, The Jesuit and the Incas: The Extraordinary Life of Padre Blas Valera SJ (Michigan, 2004) won the Donald B. King Distinguished Scholarship Prize (2004); her second book, The Quito Manuscript: An Inca History Preserved by Fernando de Montesinos (Yale University Publications in Anthropology, 2007) recently was published in Ecuador in a Spanish translation. She is currently co-director of a multi-disciplinary project studying the history of the indigenous Chanka people of the central Andes.

Anita Cook

Anita Cook

Sep 28 - Oct 8, 2015

Anita G. Cook is an archaeologist specializing in the Central Andes with over 37 years of research in the region. She has conducted archaeological tours in the Andes since 1987. She currently teaches at The Catholic University of America in Washington DC. She has been visiting Professor of Anthropology at the National University of San Cristóbal de Huamanga, Ayacucho, Peru and served as Research Associate in the Department of Anthropology at the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution. Dr. Cook received Municipal Honorary Recognition and a Medal for defending and preserving the site of Conchopata-in Ayacucho, Peru. As director of the Lower Ica Valley Archaeological Project and co-director of the Conchopata Archaeological Project her research focuses on the emergence of early Andean States and empires in particular the Wari and Tiwnaku predecessors of the Incas with a particular focus on material culture, the visual arts, and iconography.

Her research has been internationally recognized through grant and fellowship awards including: the Fulbright Commission for field research; National Endowment for the Humanities, an in residence fellowship and Summer Research grants from Dumbarton Oaks, Harvard University; and another in residence Ailsa Mellon Bruce Senior Fellowship, Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, The National Gallery of Art and most recently with the Cleveland Museum of Art.

Dr. Cook is the author of Ritual Sacrifice in Ancient Peru, edited by Elizabeth Benson and Anita Cook (2001) and Wari y Tiwanaku: entre el estilo y la imagen (1994), and numerous articles. She has been a consultant for national and international museum exhibits, research seminars and sponsored research programs. In addition, she is active in conservation efforts to protect threatened cultural remains in Andean South America and is a founding member of the Latin American and Latino Program of The Catholic University of America.

Patricia Hostiuck

Patricia Hostiuck

Nov 23 - Dec 3, 2015

A popular and respected naturalist, Patty Hostiuck is well-versed in tropical as well as polar ecosystems. Patty leads trips to the Amazon and Orinoco Rivers, Peru, Chile, Costa Rica, Panama, Belize, Honduras, the Caribbean, and Baja California, as well as Australia, and Borneo. Patty’'s high-latitude work has taken her to every northerly nation from the Canadian High Arctic, Greenland, and Iceland to Svalbard, Norway, and Russia. Over 20 trips to Antarctica, Tierra del Fuego, and Patagonia make for a nearly pole-to-pole career!

Patty has led over 50 trips with Smithsonian Journeys. Fun to travel with, she has shared her expertise in mammals, birds, insects, and plants aboard ships and on the trail with thousands of fellow explorers in dozens of remote areas.

Regina Harrison

Regina Harrison

Mar 7 - 17, 2016

Regina Harrison is a specialist in the language of the Incas, Quechua.  She received her Ph.D. from the University of Illinois and is a professor of Latin American Literatures and Comparative Literature at the University of Maryland.  Her first book, Signs, Songs, and Memory in the Andes: Translating Quechua Language and Culture (1989), won several prizes, including the Kovacs Award from the Modern Language Association.  With 35 years of research experience in the Andes, she has written books and articles on Ecuadorian literature as well as a study of Quechua theological translation, Sin and Confession in Colonial Peru (2014).  Her research has been well funded over the years, with awards from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, Fulbright, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Social Science Research Council, and the American Council of Learned Societies.

Dr. Harrison turned to video production to best record her observation of ecological tourism in the Andes, directing Cashing in on Culture: Indigenous Communities and Tourism (2002) as well as filming and directing  Mined to Death in Potosí, Bolivia (2005), winner of a Latin American Studies Association award in film. Her most recent video is Gringo Kullki: From Sucres to Dollars in Ecuador (2015), in the Quichua language with English subtitles.

Dr. Harrison's scholarship reflects her experiences in living abroad: as a Peace Corps Volunteer in the Galápagos Islands, as a researcher living with indigenous communities in Ecuador, and as a scholar in the archives and libraries of Lima, Cuzco, and Quito.  She is also an accomplished guide to the Andean region.  She led hiking trips to study archeological sites in the Andes as a professor at Bates College and was director of two semester programs in Ecuador.  Recently, she was appointed director of the University of Maryland semester programs in Madrid and Seville (Spain).  In addition, she has been a visiting professor at the Universidad Andina Simón Bolívar (Quito) and at the Centro Estudios Regionales Andinos 'Bartolomé de Las Casas' (Cuzco).

David Scott Palmer

David Scott Palmer

Apr 18 - 28, 2016

David Scott Palmer is Boston University's Founding Director of the Latin American Studies Program and Professor Emeritus of International Relations and Political Science. Before joining the Boston University faculty, he served as Chair of Latin American and Caribbean Studies and Associate Dean of Area Studies at the U.S. State Department Foreign Service Institute.

Over the years, he has traveled widely throughout Central America and Panama. His experience in the region includes public diplomacy lecture tours in each of the countries and assessments of their diplomatic services for the U.N. Development Program (UNDP). He has also taught seminars at the Latin American Social Science Faculty (FLACSO) of Costa Rica and served on the Latin American Studies Association (LASA) Observer Mission at the Central American Presidents negotiations in San José (which produced the Arias Peace Plan, for which Costa Rican President Oscar Arias was awarded the Nobel Prize. In addition, he was invited to give presentations in Panama in preparation for the final definitive handover of the Canal, and made a recent passage through this early 20th century engineering marvel. Dr. Palmer is a popular Smithsonian Journeys Expert and has led unforgettable journeys around Latin America.

Bob Szaro

Bob Szaro

Sep 19 - 29, 2016

Bob Szaro grew up fascinated by nature and started bird-watching while in grade school. He has an enthusiastic passion for different cultures, architecture, art, natural history, and photography.  His extensive travels and studies have taken him to more than 100 countries.  From the warmth of African plains to the frigid Arctic he has had the opportunity to enjoy and study an incredible variety of animals and plants and their interaction with the human cultures dependent upon them. 

His research has included , biodiversity conservation, bird community dynamics, climate change, forest stresses on mountain ecosystems, ecological approaches to natural resource management, desert and riparian plant ecosystems, and fish, wildlife, and forest resources throughout Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin America. Bob retired in 2008 as Chief Scientist for Biology for the US Geological Survey in Reston, Virginia. Bob received a Dual Bachelors Degree in Wildlife and Fisheries Biology from Texas A&M University (1970), a Master’s Degree in Zoology from the University of Florida (1972), and a Doctoral Degree in Ecology from Northern Arizona University (1976). He also completed the Senior Executive Fellows program at Harvard University (1993). Bob currently serves as a consultant to the Smithsonian Institution on biodiversity, climate change, and tiger conservation. Dr. Szaro is a popular Smithsonian Journeys Expert and has led many unforgettable journeys to destinations across the world.