Visit the mystifying ruins at Machu Picchu then travel to the fascinating Galápagos Islands to observe abundant wildlife, including giant tortoises, Blue-footed Boobies, and sea lions.

Starting at: $8,793 * Includes airfare, taxes & all fees Make a Reservation Ask Us A Question or Call 855-330-1542
 Historic Sanctuary of Machu Picchu  A pair of Blue-footed Boobies  Quechua woman out for an afternoon stroll Credit: Lola Akinmade  Llama overlooking Machu Picchu   Exploring the renowned stone work of Machu Picchu   The site of Ollantaytambo in the Sacred Valley  Terraced landscape of Písac in the Sacred Valley  Town square in Lima  The historic city center of Cuzco  A tortoise and a traveler   Seals and Sally Lightfoot crabs  Mother and baby seal  Seals basking on the beach  A colorful Sally Lightfoot crab  A frigate bird  Iguana on the Galapagos Islands

Machu Picchu and the Galápagos

16 days from $8,793 | includes airfare, taxes and all fees

Visit the mystifying ruins at Machu Picchu then travel to the fascinating Galápagos Islands to observe abundant wildlife, including giant tortoises, Blue-footed Boobies, and sea lions.

or Call 855-330-1542

Tour Details

TOUR BROCHURE

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WHAT OUR TRAVELERS SAY

This is a once in a lifetime trip -- an outstanding travel and learning adventure. 

- Mary H.

I would recommend Smithsonian Tours to anyone, from the novice to the most experienced traveler. Single travelers will certainly feel at home as well. I feel sure I will travel with Smithsonian again.

- Rosalee C.

"This was our first time with a tour group. An excellent experience in every way! The tour directors, expert, and guides were incredibly knowledgeable. I'm so glad we chose Smithsonian Journeys!"

- Steve and Nancy, S.

JOURNEYS DISPATCHES

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Experts

May 18 - Jun 2, 2019 Departure
Patrick Burkhart

Patrick Burkhart

Patrick Burkhart received his doctorate from Lehigh University and has been a professor of geology for several decades. His expertise lies in the science of groundwater, while he also holds a deep passion for geomorphology – the study of landscapes. He revels in the history of exploration, with particular focus upon the quests of Ernest Shackleton and Charles Darwin.  The latter of whom he has written and lectured upon extensively. He has an affinity for the cryosphere – frozen places at high latitude and high altitude. He looks forward to sharing adventurous discovery with you.

Jun 1 - 16, 2019 Departure
Jim Reynolds

Jim Reynolds

Jim Reynolds is Professor of Geology at Brevard College. He received his A.B. in Earth Science and A.M. in Volcanology from Dartmouth College. After working in industry, government, and academia, he returned to Dartmouth for a Ph.D. His research focused on the uplift of the Andes in Argentina, Chile, and Bolivia and Central American volcanism. He is writing a book about the Geology of Iceland. Reynolds was awarded two Fulbright Scholarships to teach at Argentine universities. Jim is an ardent environmentalist and a strong advocate for environmental issues. He is completing his second term on the Board of Directors of the Galapagos Conservancy. As a field‐oriented scientist and educator, Jim is enthusiastic to provide outdoor and hands-on learning experiences.

Jul 13 - 28, 2019 Departure
Regina Harrison

Regina Harrison

Regina Harrison is a specialist in the language of the Incas, Quechua.  She received her Ph.D. from the University of Illinois and is Professor Emerita of Latin American Literatures and Comparative Literature at the University of Maryland.  Her first book, Signs, Songs, and Memory in the Andes: Translating Quechua Language and Culture (1989), won several prizes, including the Kovacs Award from the Modern Language Association.  With 35 years of research experience in the Andes, she has written books and articles on Ecuadorian literature as well as a study of Quechua theological translation, Sin and Confession in Colonial Peru (2014).  Her research has been well funded over the years, with awards from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, Fulbright, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Social Science Research Council, and the American Council of Learned Societies.

Dr. Harrison turned to video production to best record her observation of ecological tourism in the Andes, directing Cashing in on Culture: Indigenous Communities and Tourism (2002) as well as filming and directing  Mined to Death in Potosí, Bolivia (2005), winner of a Latin American Studies Association award in film. Her most recent video is Gringo Kullki: From Sucres to Dollars in Ecuador (2015), in the Quichua language with English subtitles.

Dr. Harrison's scholarship reflects her experiences in living abroad: as a Peace Corps Volunteer in the Galápagos Islands, as a researcher living with indigenous communities in Ecuador, and as a scholar in the archives and libraries of Lima, Cuzco, and Quito.  She is also an accomplished guide to the Andean region.  She led hiking trips to study archeological sites in the Andes as a professor at Bates College and was director of two semester programs in Ecuador.  Recently, she was appointed director of the University of Maryland semester programs in Madrid and Seville (Spain).  In addition, she has been a visiting professor at the Universidad Andina Simón Bolívar (Quito) and at the Centro Estudios Regionales Andinos 'Bartolomé de Las Casas' (Cuzco).

Aug 31 - Sep 15, 2019 Departure
Dennis Wille Sáenz

Dennis Wille Sáenz

Dennis became enamored of wildlife as a youngster in his native Costa Rica. Living in Central America, it is not difficult to see how biology could become the favorite science for any nature enthusiast, as there are several thousand species in the region. He has a passion for bird sounds and has a collection of them — recently he worked on the creation of a DVD that mixes the piano with the sounds of the birds.

His experience and knowledge has taken him to lead groups in other countries in Central America, South America, Africa, New Zealand, South East Asia, Australia, Russia, Alaska, the Arctic, the Antarctic, and the Caribbean. When he is not lecturing, Dennis travels to remote areas in Central America explaining to young students how fragile the ecosystems are where they live. He also works on several projects to monitor endangered species in order to improve conservation efforts.

Sep 28 - Oct 13, 2019 Departure
Don Wilson

Don Wilson

Don Wilson is Curator Emeritus of Mammals at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History and was named senior scientist in January 2000. Don was director of the Smithsonian's Biodiversity Programs for ten years. A distinguished mammalogist and an internationally recognized authority on bats, he earned his Ph.D. in Biology from the University of New Mexico. He is the author of over 270 scientific publications and 30 books, including the highly acclaimed 9-volume series Handbook of Mammals of the World. For the last 50 years, his work has taken him around the world conducting field work and research. He has led tours for Smithsonian Journeys to most of the world's greatest natural history destinations, from Antarctica to Zimbabwe. Don loves to share his passion for the natural world, and his easygoing nature, sense of humor, and excellent presentations have earned him much praise and a loyal following from Smithsonian travelers.

Oct 26 - Nov 10, 2019 Departure
Pat Dickerson

Pat Dickerson

Dr. Pat Dickerson is a geologist and visiting research fellow with the Jackson School of Geosciences - University of Texas at Austin and the American Geosciences Institute. Her field research focuses on rifts of the world:  Iceland, Oslo rift, the Rio Grande rift, as well as on mountain-building:  the North American Cordillera and Rocky Mts., Argentine Andes, Sierra Madre Oriental of Mexico, Norwegian and Scottish Caledonides, the southwestern Appalachian chain, and Southern Alps of New Zealand. Long intrigued by the interplay of geologic processes and human activities, she was schooled in geology and classical archaeology (B.A.), then geology/tectonics (Ph.D.) at UT at Austin. She draws from those experiences in leading geological and natural history field seminars for Smithsonian groups (since 2003), for students, and for professional scientists. Pat has served on task forces to develop scientific strategies for exploring the Moon and Mars, and she collaborates with NASA on field training to prepare astronauts for such missions.

Nov 2 - 17, 2019 Departure; Jan 11 - 26, 2020 Departure
Franklin Knight

Franklin Knight

Franklin W. Knight joined the faculty of the Johns Hopkins University in 1973. He was appointed the Leonard and Helen R. Stulman Professor of History from 1991 to 2014, when he entered emeritus status. Knight’s research interests focus on social, political and cultural aspects of Latin America and the Caribbean especially after the eighteenth century as well as on American slave systems in their comparative dimensions.  Knight has lectured widely across North and South America, as well as in Europe, Australia, and Japan. He has traveled to Cuba 63 times during the past 35+ years.

Knight has graduated from the University College of the West Indies-London in 1964 where he earned a B.A. He also earned M. A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Wisconsin in Madison. He taught for several years at the State University of New York in Stony Brook, and was a visiting lecturer at the University of Texas in Austin, Howard University, Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas, Colgate University, and in Spain at the Pablo de Olavide University, The University of Huelva, and the University of Andalucía. He has also served on visiting advisory committees of Harvard University, Princeton University, City University of New York, Swarthmore College, Ohio State University, Colgate University, The Schomburg Library, The University of Florida at Gainesville and the University of Puerto Rico at Rio Piedras.

Knight has held research fellowships from the Social Science Research Council, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, the Ford Foundation, and the National Humanities Center. He has served on committees of the Social Science Research Council, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Inter-American Foundation, the National Research Council, the American Historical Association, the Conference of Latin American History, The Latin American Studies Association, The American Council of Learned Societies, The Historical Society, and the Association of Caribbean Historians. He is a founding member of The Asociación de Historiadores de América Latina y el Caribe (ADHILAC), the Asociación de Historiadores Latinoamericanos (AHILA), and The Asociación de Historia Económica del Caribe (AHEC).

His analyses of Latin American and Caribbean problems have been aired on National Public Radio, the Voice of America, the British Broadcasting Corporation, the McNeill/Lehrer Report, C-Span, as well as on many local programs on commercial and public radio and television stations across the United States. He served as academic consultant and appeared in seven television programs Columbus and the Age of DiscoveryThe Buried Mirror;  AmericasPlagued: Invisible ArmiesCrucible of Empire: The War of 1898The Crucible of the Millennium; and The Louisiana Purchase. 

Feb 29 - Mar 15, 2020 Departure
Anita Cook

Anita Cook

Anita G. Cook is an archaeologist specializing in the Central Andes with over 37 years of research in the region. She has conducted archaeological tours in the Andes since 1987. She currently teaches at The Catholic University of America in Washington DC. She has been visiting Professor of Anthropology at the National University of San Cristóbal de Huamanga, Ayacucho, Peru and served as Research Associate in the Department of Anthropology at the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution. Dr. Cook received Municipal Honorary Recognition and a Medal for defending and preserving the site of Conchopata-in Ayacucho, Peru. As director of the Lower Ica Valley Archaeological Project and co-director of the Conchopata Archaeological Project her research focuses on the emergence of early Andean States and empires in particular the Wari and Tiwnaku predecessors of the Incas with a particular focus on material culture, the visual arts, and iconography.

Her research has been internationally recognized through grant and fellowship awards including: the Fulbright Commission for field research; National Endowment for the Humanities, an in residence fellowship and Summer Research grants from Dumbarton Oaks, Harvard University; and another in residence Ailsa Mellon Bruce Senior Fellowship, Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, The National Gallery of Art and most recently with the Cleveland Museum of Art.

Dr. Cook is the author of Ritual Sacrifice in Ancient Peru, edited by Elizabeth Benson and Anita Cook (2001) and Wari y Tiwanaku: entre el estilo y la imagen (1994), and numerous articles. She has been a consultant for national and international museum exhibits, research seminars and sponsored research programs. In addition, she is active in conservation efforts to protect threatened cultural remains in Andean South America and is a founding member of the Latin American and Latino Program of The Catholic University of America.

May 2 - 17, 2020 Departure
Nina Zitani

Nina Zitani

Dr. Nina Zitani is an accomplished field research biologist with a passion for teaching people of all ages and backgrounds about the wonders of the living parts of the natural world. Her published research includes discovering and naming 15 new insect species of Costa Rica; scientists have named eight new insect species in her honor. Recent research has focused on the ecology of the Onychophora (velvet worms) of Ecuador. A graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design, she uses her extraordinary creativity and photography to enrich her lectures on natural history, evolutionary biology, biodiversity and conservation science. For nearly 30 years she has been a science educator in the classroom and in the field. Her engaging natural history lessons on topics ranging from pollination, to the ecology of native plants and food webs, to the evolution of birds incorporate stories and imagery from her North American field experiences and 24 expeditions to Costa Rica, Ecuador and Peru. Dr. Zitani resides in London, Ontario, Canada where she is the Curator of Zoological Collections and Assistant Professor in the Department of Biology at Western University. 

May 30 - Jun 14, 2020 Departure
Wayne Ranney

Wayne Ranney

Wayne Ranney is a geologist and writer who is a veteran of expedition travel, having journeyed to and lectured on all of Earth’s seven continents. He is the recipient of the 2018 American Association of Petroleum Geologists “Geosciences in the Media Award” and has received other national and regional honors for his writing, lectures, blog postings, and expeditionary guiding. His foreign and domestic travels have taken him to South America (Patagonia, Tierra del Fuego, and the Amazon), Australia and New Zealand, the Polar regions (Antarctica, Iceland, and Greenland), and desert landscapes in Africa, Asia, the Atacama, and the American Southwest.

With a lifelong interest in the earth sciences, Wayne specializes in making the fascinating story of our planet come alive for fellow travelers. He was elected to the Explorers Club and has visited more than 85 countries. Wayne is a retired professor of geology who lives in Flagstaff, Arizona near his beloved Grand Canyon. He is passionate about sharing his vast knowledge of earth history with others in an easy-going and informal style, yet he is a well-respected author of numerous award-winning books and articles. He enjoys languages, hiking, river running, photography, conversation, and anything that allows him to get outdoors with others in seeing the varied and interesting landscapes of our beautiful planet.

Sep 26 - Oct 11, 2020 Departure
Peter Bobrowsky

Peter Bobrowsky

Peter Bobrowsky is a professional archaeologist and geologist with 30 years of experience working as a consultant, scholar and researcher in North America, South America, Africa, Asia, Europe and the Middle East. He obtained his PhD in 1989 from the University of Alberta and is currently an Adjunct Full Professor at both Simon Fraser University and the University of Victoria in British Columbia, Canada. An author of some 350 scientific publications including several technical books such as the Encyclopedia of Natural Hazards, he was elected as an International Fellow of the Explorers Club of New York and a Fellow of the Geological Society of America. He is the recipient of numerous awards including the Eugene Shoemaker Communications Award for Best Book in 2009, the Edward B. Burwell Jr. Award for Engineering Geology in 2011 and the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal in 2012. Dr. Bobrowsky has a prominent history of international positions and appointments including former Secretary General of the International Union of Geological Sciences an NGO representing some 1 million earth scientists around the world, former President of the Canadian Quaternary Association, and former President of the Geological Association of Canada. A popular lecturer for the Smithsonian, he is a passionate traveler who has visited some 100 countries. Known for his scholarly insights and enthusiastic and easygoing speaking style, he will bring to life the crucial link between landscapes and society.