Explore two of South America's most important cultural and natural treasures—the World Heritage sites of Machu Picchu and the Galápagos Islands—in one exciting tour! Travel to Peru and venture to Cusco, the Sacred Valley, and the "Lost City of the Incas," then fly to the Galápagos Islands to observe fascinating wildlife, including Blue-footed Boobies, giant tortoises, and sea lions. 

Starting at: $9,293 * Includes airfare, taxes & all fees Make a Reservation Ask Us A Question or Call 855-330-1542
 Machu Picchu  A pair of Blue-footed Boobies  Quechua woman out for an afternoon stroll Credit: Lola Akinmade  Llama overlooking Machu Picchu   Exploring the renowned stone work of Machu Picchu   The site of Ollantaytambo in the Sacred Valley  Historic Sanctuary of Machu Picchu  Terraced landscape of Písac in the Sacred Valley  Town square in Lima  The historic city center of Cuzco  A tortoise and a traveler   Seals and Sally Lightfoot crabs  Mother and baby seal  Seals basking on the beach  A colorful Sally Lightfoot crab  A frigate bird  Iguana on the Galapagos Islands

Machu Picchu and the Galápagos

16 days from $9,293 | includes airfare, taxes and all fees

Explore two of South America's most important cultural and natural treasures—the World Heritage sites of Machu Picchu and the Galápagos Islands—in one exciting tour! Travel to Peru and venture to Cusco, the Sacred Valley, and the "Lost City of the Incas," then fly to the Galápagos Islands to observe fascinating wildlife, including Blue-footed Boobies, giant tortoises, and sea lions. 

or Call 855-330-1542

Tour Details

TOUR BROCHURE

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WHAT OUR TRAVELERS SAY

Our tour with the Smithsonian to South America [Machu Picchu and Galapagos) was without a doubt one of the most fun, enjoyable, and educational journeys we have taken. Our fellow travelers quickly bonded and we are still in contact with many of them. We look forward to our next adventure with educated and thoughtful people.

- David L.

This is a once in a lifetime trip -- an outstanding travel and learning adventure. 

- Mary H.

I would recommend Smithsonian Tours to anyone, from the novice to the most experienced traveler. Single travelers will certainly feel at home as well. I feel sure I will travel with Smithsonian again.

- Rosalee C.

"This was our first time with a tour group. An excellent experience in every way! The tour directors, expert, and guides were incredibly knowledgeable. I'm so glad we chose Smithsonian Journeys!"

- Steve and Nancy S.

JOURNEYS DISPATCHES

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Experts

Feb 27 - Mar 14, 2021 Departure
Bill Sapp

Bill Sapp

Bill Sapp is an archaeologist with special expertise in the Andes. He has been leading archaeological and cultural tours of Peru for more than a decade and is an expert in the Inca sites of Machu Picchu and the Machu Picchu Sanctuary, the Sacred Valley, and other sites located in and around Cuzco. Bill serves as a director for the non-profit corporation Conservation Volunteers International Program, where he organizes and leads groups of volunteers who work with the Peruvian Cultural Ministry to maintain and preserve Inca ruins in the Machu Picchu Sanctuary. He also works with the Peruvian Ministry of the Environment to help maintain biodiversity within the Sanctuary. Bill received his Ph.D. in anthropology from UCLA, where his doctoral dissertation documented his excavations at Cabur, a country palace located on Peru’s north coast. He also excavated at the Chimú administrative center of Algarrobal de Moro and the Lambayeque/ Chimú administrative center at Farfán. Dr. Sapp teaches part-time at California State University San Bernardino, where his courses include South American archaeology, an introduction to world civilizations, and an archaeological field school co-sponsored by the U.S. Forest Service and the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians. He also serves as an archaeologist for the U.S. Forest Service and as a tribal liaison between the U.S. government and 11 federally recognized Indian tribes.

Apr 3 - 18, 2021 Departure
Paul Goldstein

Paul Goldstein

Paul Goldstein received his Ph.D. in 1989 from the University of Chicago and previously held a position in the Department of Anthropology at Dartmouth College. His teaching and research focus on anthropological archaeology, complex societies, Latin America and Andean South America.

Paul's research involves the study of how Tiwanaku civilization, the earliest state level polity that emerged in the important lake Titicaca region of the southern Andes, expanded, and collapsed (ca. 350-1000 AD).

He has received a variety of research funding, including grants from the National Science Foundation, Wenner-Gren, H. John Heinz III Charitable Trust, Fulbright (1999 for Ecuador), and Fulbright-Hays (1998 for Peru) as well as Tinker Foundation and Mellon Foundation. Paul has been the recipient of numerous fellowships and awards including Dumbarton Oaks Fellowship in Pre-Columbian Studies and has held several museum positions at Museo Contisuyo, Peru; American Museum of Natural History, New York; Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago; and Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago. Paul has been Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, San Diego.

May 8 - 23, 2021 Departure; Jul 17 - Aug 1, 2021 Departure
Dennis Ogburn

Dennis Ogburn

Dennis Ogburn is an archaeologist who specializes in the study of the Inca Empire and other ancient societies in Andean South America. A native of North Carolina, he went west to attend college at Rice University before moving even further west to earn his MA and PhD at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Subsequently, he worked at the Archaeological Research Facility at the University of California, Berkeley, then moved back east, where he is now Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. He has been active in fieldwork and research in Andean archaeology for over 20 years, leading or participating in work in the southern and northern highlands of Ecuador and in the Cuzco, Ayacucho, and Nasca regions of Peru. His research is at the intersection of science and history, as he employs scientific techniques such as geochemical sourcing and radiocarbon dating in combination with the analysis of historical documents. He has written a number of scholarly works, including articles in prominent journals such as Latin American Antiquity, Ethnohistory, and the Journal of Archaeological Science, and a co-edited volume Foundations of Power in the Prehispanic Andes, published by the American Anthropological Association. Topics of some of those publications include the scope of warfare in the Inca Empire, the long‐distance movement of large building stones in the Inca Empire, and the Inca conquest and occupation of highland Ecuador. In recent and on-going projects, he has been investigating the interpretation of quipus (the Inca writing system), the origins of Inca building stones in the Cuzco region, and the contents of drinking vessels from the Peruvian coast. At UNC Charlotte, he regularly teaches courses in archaeology and related subjects, including South American Archaeology and Ethnohistory of New World Peoples. In addition to a general affinity for old things, his interests include playing guitar, hiking, bicycling, collecting rocks, and learning about native plants and animals.

Jun 5 - 20, 2021 Departure
Pat Dickerson

Pat Dickerson

Dr. Pat Dickerson is a geologist and visiting research fellow with the Jackson School of Geosciences - University of Texas at Austin and the American Geosciences Institute. Her field research focuses on rifts of the world:  Iceland, Oslo rift, the Rio Grande rift, as well as on mountain-building:  the North American Cordillera and Rocky Mts., Argentine Andes, Sierra Madre Oriental of Mexico, Norwegian and Scottish Caledonides, the southwestern Appalachian chain, and Southern Alps of New Zealand. Long intrigued by the interplay of geologic processes and human activities, she was schooled in geology and classical archaeology (B.A.), then geology/tectonics (Ph.D.) at UT at Austin. She draws from those experiences in leading geological and natural history field seminars for Smithsonian groups (since 2003), for students, and for professional scientists. Pat has served on task forces to develop scientific strategies for exploring the Moon and Mars, and she collaborates with NASA on field training to prepare astronauts for such missions.

Sep 25 - Oct 10, 2021 Departure
Jim Reynolds

Jim Reynolds

Jim Reynolds is Professor Emeritus of Geology at Brevard College. He received his A.B. in Earth Science and A.M. in Volcanology from Dartmouth College. After working in industry, government, and academia, he returned to Dartmouth for a Ph.D. His research focused on the uplift of the Andes in Argentina, Chile, and Bolivia and Central American volcanism. He is writing a book about the Geology of Iceland. Reynolds was awarded two Fulbright Scholarships to teach at Argentine universities. Jim is an ardent environmentalist and a strong advocate for environmental issues. He is completing his second term on the Board of Directors of the Galapagos Conservancy. As a field‐oriented scientist and educator, Jim is enthusiastic to provide outdoor and hands-on learning experiences.

Oct 9 - 24, 2021 Departure
Anita Cook

Anita Cook

Anita G. Cook is an archaeologist specializing in the Central Andes with over 37 years of research in the region. She has conducted archaeological tours in the Andes since 1987. She currently teaches at The Catholic University of America in Washington DC. She has been visiting Professor of Anthropology at the National University of San Cristóbal de Huamanga, Ayacucho, Peru and served as Research Associate in the Department of Anthropology at the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution. Dr. Cook received Municipal Honorary Recognition and a Medal for defending and preserving the site of Conchopata-in Ayacucho, Peru. As director of the Lower Ica Valley Archaeological Project and co-director of the Conchopata Archaeological Project her research focuses on the emergence of early Andean States and empires in particular the Wari and Tiwnaku predecessors of the Incas with a particular focus on material culture, the visual arts, and iconography.

Her research has been internationally recognized through grant and fellowship awards including: the Fulbright Commission for field research; National Endowment for the Humanities, an in residence fellowship and Summer Research grants from Dumbarton Oaks, Harvard University; and another in residence Ailsa Mellon Bruce Senior Fellowship, Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, The National Gallery of Art and most recently with the Cleveland Museum of Art.

Dr. Cook is the author of Ritual Sacrifice in Ancient Peru, edited by Elizabeth Benson and Anita Cook (2001) and Wari y Tiwanaku: entre el estilo y la imagen (1994), and numerous articles. She has been a consultant for national and international museum exhibits, research seminars and sponsored research programs. In addition, she is active in conservation efforts to protect threatened cultural remains in Andean South America and is a founding member of the Latin American and Latino Program of The Catholic University of America.