Italy’s breathtaking Lake District has inspired painters, writers, and poets. Enjoy the area's gardens, arts, and contemporary life, set amid Italy's northern lakes and mountains, during this one-week stay in Stresa.

Starting at: $3,740 Make a Reservation Ask Us A Question or Call 855-330-1542
 The lovely Borromean island of Isola Bella, located on Lake Maggiore  The splendid gardens on Isola Bella, Lake Maggiore  The gardens of Isola Bella on Lake Maggiore  Parterre gardens on Isola Bella, Lake Maggiore  White peacock at home on Isola Bella  View of Stresa and islands on Lake Maggiore  Isola San Giulio, Lake Orta  Villa along the shores of Lake Como  View of Pallanza on Lake Maggiore  The ornate Gothic cathedral of Milan

Italy's Lake District

A One-Week Stay in Stresa Featuring Lake Maggiore, Lake Como, and Lake Orta

9 days from $3,740

Italy’s breathtaking Lake District has inspired painters, writers, and poets. Enjoy the area's gardens, arts, and contemporary life, set amid Italy's northern lakes and mountains, during this one-week stay in Stresa.

or Call 855-330-1542

Experts

Jun 23 - Jul 1, 2018 Departure
Luca Zavagno

Luca Zavagno

Luca Zavagno was born in Venice, where he received his B.A. degree in History from the University Ca’Foscari; he completed his Ph.D. studies at the University of Birmingham on the society, culture, economics and politics of Byzantine cities. He is Assistant Professor in the Department of History at Bilkent University and Visiting Professor of Byzantine Art History at University Ca’Foscari of Venice. He is currently working on his forthcoming book An Island in Transition: Cyprus between Late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages (ca. 600-ca. 850) to be published by Ashgate.
Dr. Zavagno is the author of many articles on the early Medieval Mediterranean, of the edited volume Islands of Eastern Mediterranean. A History of Cross Cultural Encounters (with Özlem Caykent) and of Cities in Transition: Urbanism in Byzantium Between Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages (British Archaeological Reports-International Series, 2009), a book which explores the impact of important historical events on urban settlements in the Pontus (Amastris), Italy (Naples), Western Anatolia (Ephesus), and Greece (Gortyn and Athens) during this period. He is also the co-organizer of the annual Conference of the Mediterranean Worlds, Associate Scholar of the Mediterranean Seminar, and a Teaching Fellow of the School of Advanced Studies of the Università di Salerno.

Aug 25 - Sep 2, 2018 Departure
David Guinee

David Guinee

David A. Guinee teaches at DePauw University in Greencastle, Indiana, where he is the Edwin Minar Professor of Classical Studies. He coordinates the Latin program at DePauw University and teaches courses in Latin and Greek at all levels and periods, with courses ranging from Homeric Greek to Late Antique and Medieval Latin, as well as a wide range of courses in Classics in translation, including Greek and Roman Mythology, Greek and Roman Law, Roman Civilization, the Age of Augustus, and the Legacies of Constantine. From 2009 to 2012 Dave served as DePauw's Faculty Development Coordinator. He earned his BA in Classical Languages at Carleton College and his PhD in Classical Philology at the University of Michigan. Dave's research is focused on Latin poetry, particularly epic after Vergil. He has been an active participant with the Center for Hellenic Studies' Sunoikisis project, developing collaborative inter-institution courses in Greek and Latin literature, and has been a CHS Sunoikisis Fellow for Curricular Development. He has led many student study tours through Italy and has lived in Rome and Siena, where he served as a Visiting Faculty member for the AHA International Study Program. In addition to Classics, Dave enjoys flyfishing and playing bluegrass 5-string banjo.

Oct 22 - 30, 2018 Departure; Sep 17 - 25, 2019 Departure
John Paoletti

John Paoletti

John Paoletti received his Ph.D in art history from Yale University.  He taught the history of Italian Renaissance art and of the art of the twentieth century at Wesleyan University from 1972 to 2009, having previously taught at Bryn Mawr College and Dartmouth College.  Professor Paoletti was a William R. Kenan Professor of the Humanities at Wesleyan from 2005 until his retirement.  He received the Binswanger Prize for Excellence in Teaching at Wesleyan in 1997 and the Distinguished Teaching of Art History Award from the College Art Association in 2003.  He was a Fellow at the School of Historical Studies, Institute of Advanced Study, Princeton in the spring of 2001 and Visiting Professor at the Villa I Tatti, Harvard’s Center for Renaissance Studies in Florence, in the late fall of 2008.  He is currently serving as a member of the Committee on Prints and Drawings at the Museum of Modern Art, New York.  From 1996-2000 he was the editor-in-chief of The Art Bulletin, the journal of record in art history in the United States. 

Profesor Paoletti has contributed articles on Italian sculpture and Medici patronage to a number of essay collections and festschriften, and to The Art Bulletin, the Jahrbuch der Berliner Museen, Artibus et Historiae, Pantheon, and Renaissance Quarterly.  He has also written widely on American, British, and German art of the second half of the twentieth century.

He served as guest curator for exhibitions at the Wadsworth Atheneum and the Yale Center for British Art, as well as at Wesleyan.   He lectured on a number of occasions at the Metropolitan Museum and for the Friends of Florence and he previously was the lecturer for a Smithsonian cruise along the Dalmatian coast. Professor Paoletti is the co-author with Gary Radke of Art in Renaissance Italy, now in its fourth edition. With Roger Crum he is the co-editor of and contributing author to Renaissance Florence: a Social History, (New York, 2006).  He has contributed catalogue essays for exhibitions at the Walker Art Center, the National Gallery of Art and the Nürnberg Kunsthalle.  His book, Michelangelo’s David: Florentine History and Civic Identity, will appear from Cambridge University Press in 2015.  He is currently at work on Medici patronage during the fifteenth century and on a monograph on the contemporary German artist Georg Baselitz.

Jun 11 - 19, 2019 Departure
Allan Langdale

Allan Langdale

Allan Langdale is an art and architectural historian, filmmaker, photographer, and travel writer who received his Ph.D. in art history from UC Santa Barbara. Allan has taught courses in Italian Renaissance art, Byzantine art, East Indian art, and Islamic art and currently teaches art history at UC Santa Cruz and film studies at UC Santa Barbara.

He has written the definitive guidebook to the little known region of Turkish Cyprus, In a Contested Realm (2012) and also made a documentary film on the architecture and history of the medieval city of Famagusta, The Stones of Famagusta: the Story of a Forgotten City (2008). Allan’s most recent book is Palermo: Travels in the City of Happiness (2015).

A popular Smithsonian Expert, Allan has traveled extensively in the Mediterranean, the Middle East, including Jordan and Egypt, and India. He lectures often in Italy, Greece, Turkey, Egypt and the Middle East.