Travel to the “top of the world” in Nepal and Bhutan and meet the people of these distant lands, home to Buddhist monks and Hindu deities. 

Starting at: $5,697 * Includes airfare, taxes & all fees Make a Reservation Ask Us A Question or Call 855-330-1542
 The final pathway up to Taktsang Monastery, or Tiger's Nest, in Bhutan   Duchula Pass Prayer Flags  View of the Himalayas from Nagarkot, Nepal  Durbur Square, Kathmandu, Nepal  Boudhanath Stupa, Kathmandu, Nepal  The center of Kathmandu, Nepal  The Buddha's eyes, stupa in Nepal  Sculpture at the temple in Bhaktapur, Nepal  Frieze at the Golden Temple, Patan  Prayer Wheels in Patan, Nepal  Monk with prayer wheel  View of the Himalayas from Nagarkot, Nepal  Cliff-side Taktsang Monastery with prayer flags, Bhutan  Taktsang Monastery Prayer Wheel  Punakha Dzong, Bhutan  Punakha Monastery Buddhist Painting  Chorten Stupa, Bhutan  Punakha, Bhutan  Punakha Dzong  Buddhist Monastery Dzong, Thimphu

Himalayan Kingdoms

A Journey to Nepal & Bhutan

15 days from $5,697 | includes airfare, taxes and all fees

Travel to the “top of the world” in Nepal and Bhutan and meet the people of these distant lands, home to Buddhist monks and Hindu deities. 

or Call 855-330-1542

Sep 5 - 19, 2017 Departure; Oct 24 - Nov 7, 2017 Departure
Preston Scott

Preston Scott

Preston Scott was the Curator of the Bhutan Program at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 2008, which was then the largest presentation of Bhutanese life and culture ever hosted outside of the remote Himalayan Kingdom. He also has served as an advisor to the Royal Government of Bhutan on several environmental and cultural projects and is a frequent traveler to the eastern Himalayas.  Throughout his professional career, Preston has worked in more than thirty countries around the world.  He also was the Curator of the Kenya Program at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 2014, and is preparing for a new program relating to Circus Arts for the Festival’s 50th Anniversary in 2017. 

Oct 17 - 31, 2017 Departure
Barry Till

Barry Till

Barry Till is a curator of Asian art at the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria in Canada. With a wide-ranging knowledge of Asia's history, archaeology, and cultures, Barry has travelled extensively and lectured on numerous expeditions—including trips to China, Japan, Vietnam, Cambodia, and Myanmar—for more than thirty years. He has published more than 100 exhibition catalogues (including The Buddhist Arts of Asia), books, and articles on various Asian art topics, and is an enthusiastic and engaging speaker. In 2008, Barry received the Distinguished Service Award from the Canadian Museums Association. He speaks Chinese, holds degrees in Far Eastern Studies, and studied at Oxford and at Nanjing University in China.

Apr 17 - May 1, 2018 Departure
Hugh Shapiro

Hugh Shapiro

Hugh Shapiro is a professor of East Asian history at the University of Nevada.  He has enjoyed visiting appointments at Princeton University, Nichibunken (International Research Center for Japanese Studies) in Kyoto, the National Taiwan Normal University in Taipei, and the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton.  His extensive archival and fieldwork in China, Japan, and Taiwan regards the history of medicine, disease, and the body in comparative context.  The analysis of bodily experience is a powerful tool for grappling with historical transformation, and Hugh focuses on how cultural practice and ideas, such as the integration of foreign medical systems, inflect the way that people experience illness, in particular neuropsychiatric distress.  He co-edited Medicine Across Cultures: History and Practice of Medicine in Non-Western Cultures, and his recent work appears in volumes published by Harvard University Press, Brill, Rowman & Littlefield, and Kluwer.  He received the Li-Qing Prize for the History of Chinese Science and won his university’s highest teaching award.  Hugh’s other research and teaching interests include visual and performance art, life in post-socialist societies, the military history of the Steppe, material culture in Central Asia, the history of de-colonization and revolution, and the cross-cultural experience of possession.  A popular Smithsonian Expert, Hugh earned his B.A. and M.A. from Stanford University and his Ph.D. in History & East Asian Languages from Harvard University.

Sep 4 - 18, 2018 Departure
Ken Hammond

Ken Hammond

Ken Hammond is a historian with expertise in Asia and the cultural and intellectual history of China in the late imperial era from the 10th through the 18th centuries, with special interest in the Ming dynasty. As a professor of Asian History at New Mexico State University, he teaches courses on the history of Central Asia and the Silk Road in addition to classes on Chinese history. He has also taught university students during the summer at the China Studies Program in Beijing.

Ken has recorded a 36 lecture series for The Great Courses entitled From Yao to Mao: 5000 Years of Chinese History. He also focuses on global and comparative history and is interested in urban history and cartography. Ken has published many articles on a wide range of subjects, including Chinese intellectual and political history and Chinese gardens. He received his Masters and Ph.D. from Harvard University in history and East Asian languages and has been a research scholar at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences in Beijing and at the International Institute for Asian Studies in Leiden, the Netherlands.