Celebrate winter and the polar night on this unique trip showcasing Russian treasures and a private train journey to the Arctic Circle. 

Starting at: $15,195 Make a Reservation Ask Us A Question or Call 855-330-1542
 The Northern Lights in Norway. Credit: Kirkenes Snow Hotel  Sleigh rides in Suzdal  Members of the <i>Golden Eagle</i> train personnel  Lounge aboard the <i>Golden Eagle</i>  Holiday lights in Moscow  Moscow in winter. Credit: Douglas Grimes  St. Basil's Cathedral, Red Square, Moscow  Moscow at night during the holiday season.  Credit: Meaghan Samuels  Moscow's Red Square  Cathedral of the Assumption, Vladimir  Cathedral of the Transfiguration of the Saviour, Suzdal  Interior, Cathedral of the Transfiguration of the Savior, Suzdal  The Northern Lights. Credit: Kirkenes Snow Hotel  Ice sculpture at the Snow Hotel. Credit: Kirkenes Snow Hotel  Woman in traditional Sami dress with reindeer. Credit: Norway Tourism Bureau  The Winter Palace, now the Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg. Credit: Hotel Astoria  Viewing the treasures of the Hermitage Museum  View of the Church of the Savior on Spilled Blood from a canal in St. Petersburg  The magnificent interior of the Church of the Savior on Spilled Blood, St. Petersburg  Catherine Palace, St. Petersburg

Arctic Explorer by Private Train

A Russian Train Journey Aboard the Golden Eagle

13 days from $15,195

Celebrate winter and the polar night on this unique trip showcasing Russian treasures and a private train journey to the Arctic Circle. 

or Call 855-330-1542

Tour Details

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A Smithsonian Journeys tour is not just a tour. It is an education - without the tests!

- Bob and Jasmine, B.

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Expert

Dec 28, 2020 - Jan 9, 2021 Departure
Nadia Kizenko

Nadia Kizenko

Nadieszda Kizenko teaches Russian and East European History at the State University of New York at Albany.  She received degrees in Russian History and Literature at Harvard University, Columbia University, and the Harriman Institute. Prof. Kizenko explores the intersection of nations and empires, of history and culture, and the extent to which religion has been a constituent element of national and imperial identity.  She has long been fascinated by how the three Baltic nations succeeded in keeping their distinctive identities even when ruled by Germans, Poles, and Russians. For Russia in particular, the three nations have meant a very specific form of access to Europe—and opposition to it.

Prof. Kizenko’s research, supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Social Sciences Research Council, and the National Council for Eurasian and East European Research, has allowed her to publish widely on questions of religion as an instrument of empire.  Her first book, A Prodigal Saint:  Father John of Kronstadt and the Russian People, won the Heldt Prize; a recent article, “The Feminization of Patriarchy?”, won the Best Article award from Association for the Study of Eastern Christianity.  Prof. Kizenko is currently writing a history of confession in the Russian empire.