As you navigate more than 500 miles of the Amazon River aboard the small ship Zafiro, witness an amazing variety of flora and fauna and come to understand traditional village life during this once-in-a-lifetime journey. 

Starting at: $5,295 Make a Reservation Ask Us A Question or Call 855-330-1542
 Amazon macaws  Experience the mystical Amazon River   Blue macaws  Egret as seen along the Amazon River  Sunset over the Amazon River  Poison Dart Frog  Squirrel monkey in the rain forest

Amazon River Cruise

Aboard the Exclusively Chartered Riverboat Zafiro

9-10 days from $5,295

As you navigate more than 500 miles of the Amazon River aboard the small ship Zafiro, witness an amazing variety of flora and fauna and come to understand traditional village life during this once-in-a-lifetime journey. 

or Call 855-330-1542

Tour Details

TOUR BROCHURE

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WHAT OUR TRAVELERS SAY

This trip was exactly what we were looking for - a good introduction to the nature, history and culture of the Amazon Basin in Peru. It served to whet our appetite for more explorations into the vibrant, colorful watery jungles of the Amazon. 

- Barbara T.

We loved the naturalists, the crew, the local food, and are convinced the boat was the best on the Amazon. Truly an unforgettable experience!

- Carol M.

Our trip to the Amazon River was far greater than we expected! Not only did we get to learn a lot about wildlife and Peruvian culture, but also enjoyed delicious fresh food and an exceptional service!

- Arianna B.

The trip exceeded my expectations. I chose Smithsonian because my friend and travelling companion had been with them on a trip down the Nile, but I had no idea how wonderful this trip would be.

- Smithsonian Journeys Traveler

The staff on the trip are the best I have ever encountered, and I have been to Antarctica, Galapagos, Alaska, in the Mediterranean.

- Joan S. & Peter T.

JOURNEYS DISPATCHES

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Experts

Aug 17 - 26, 2018 Departure
Ed Smith

Ed Smith

Traveling up the far reaches of the world's mightiest river offers superb views of forests stretching to the horizon, magnificent sunsets, and (to me, at least) the most delicious fresh air on the planet. But the real fun begins as we explore the details of this fascinating ecosystem and get to know the people who call this water-woven land home.

How does one adequately convey the kaleidoscopic variation on every theme of living thing found in this richest of tropical jungles? We'll see dozens of parrot species and other birdlife that defy imagination: tanagers, toucans, honey creepers, flycatchers, herons, caciques, barbets, egrets, jacamars, and tinamo, to name just a few (literally!). Far greater in variety than the birds are the fish –- we'll even try our hand at catching piranhas! Our time spent together will investigate the engines that power this system –- the myriad plants and invertebrates upon which all other life depends.

Although I've traveled the river many times as a Smithsonian Study Leader, my 'day job' is as a biologist in the Amazonia department of the National Zoo. There, we study and care for a few hundred Amazonian species of plants and animals -– yet our collection is a fraction of what we see on any given day during the Amazon Voyage.

Oct 26 - Nov 4, 2018 Departure
Pepper Trail

Pepper Trail

Pepper Trail has traveled around the world in the course of his studies on the ecology, behavior and conservation of birds. After receiving his Ph. D. from Cornell University, Pepper did post-doctoral research at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute and the California Academy of Sciences. An expert photographer and writer, his work has appeared in publications ranging from National Geographic and American Birds to Science, Evolution and Conservation Biology. Pepper has led natural history tours in Africa, Costa Rica, Brazil and the Amazon, and his enthusiasm and sense of humor always convert a few ‘'non-birders'’ to '‘birder’s' every trip. He is the ornithologist for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Forensics Laboratory in Ashland, Oregon.

Dec 21 - 30, 2018 Departure
Nina Zitani

Nina Zitani

Dr. Nina Zitani bonded with nature as a young child growing up in a small historic New Jersey town with giant trees and lots of bugs.  During her first field season as an entomology graduate student she fell in love with tropical forests and their myriad creatures at the Área de Conservación Guanacaste in Costa Rica. After working throughout Costa Rica for nearly a decade, she began teaching a field course in the upper Amazon basin of Ecuador.  She holds a Master of Science and Doctorate in systematic entomology from the University of Wyoming.  Her published research includes discovering 15 new insect species of Costa Rica.  Other scientists have named six new insect species in her honor.  Currently she resides in London, Ontario where she is an advocate for the conservation of biodiversity both locally and globally.  In 2011 she launched a popular website about biodiversity gardening, or gardening to restore biodiversity using 100% native plants.  Monarch butterflies, Giant Swallowtails, and pollinators of all shapes and sizes frequent her family’s garden each year.  She has been teaching people of all ages for nearly 25 years, and is a part-time Assistant Professor at the University of Western Ontario.  “Dr. Z”, as she is known to her students, relishes any opportunity to show scientists and non-scientists alike the astonishing biodiversity – plants, fungi and animals of all sorts – found in Neotropical forests.  

Mar 2 - 10, 2019 Departure; Mar 9 - 17, 2019 Departure
Dennis Wille Sáenz

Dennis Wille Sáenz

Dennis became enamored of wildlife as a youngster in his native Costa Rica. Living in Central America, it is not difficult to see how biology could become the favorite science for any nature enthusiast, as there are several thousand species in the region. He has a passion for bird sounds and has a collection of them — recently he worked on the creation of a DVD that mixes the piano with the sounds of the birds.

His experience and knowledge has taken him to lead groups in other countries in Central America, South America, Africa, New Zealand, South East Asia, Australia, Russia, Alaska, the Arctic, the Antarctic, and the Caribbean. When he is not lecturing, Dennis travels to remote areas in Central America explaining to young students how fragile the ecosystems are where they live. He also works on several projects to monitor endangered species in order to improve conservation efforts.