Experience one of the greatest voyages in natural history as you navigate more than 500 miles of the Amazon and its tributaries, where you’ll witness an exciting variety of animals and birds and come to understand traditional village life.

Starting at: $5,295 Make a Reservation Ask Us A Question or Call 855-330-1542
 Red Poison Dart Frog  Cruising the Amazon  Poison Dart Frog  Egret as seen along the Amazon River  Squirrel monkeys  Explore the Pacaya-Samiria Reserve with an expert tour guide  Amazon macaws  Experience the mystical Amazon River   Giant otter  Blue Morpho Butterfly  Spectacular giant water lilies, which can grow up to six feet in diameter  A sloth in the Amazon  Hoatzin  Squirrel monkey in the rain forest  Amazon River lily pads  Amazon River house  Typical village in the Amazon  Boat excursions accompanied by expert naturalists allow a close-up look at wildlife  Sunset over the Amazon River  Kayak along the Amazon in order to discover its hidden gems  Blue macaws

Amazon River Cruise

Round-trip from Lima

10 days from $5,295

Experience one of the greatest voyages in natural history as you navigate more than 500 miles of the Amazon and its tributaries, where you’ll witness an exciting variety of animals and birds and come to understand traditional village life.

or Call 855-330-1542

Tour Details

TOUR BROCHURE

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WHAT OUR TRAVELERS SAY

This trip was exactly what we were looking for - a good introduction to the nature, history and culture of the Amazon Basin in Peru. It served to whet our appetite for more explorations into the vibrant, colorful watery jungles of the Amazon. 

- Barbara T.

We loved the naturalists, the crew, the local food, and are convinced the boat was the best on the Amazon. Truly an unforgettable experience!

- Carol M.

Our trip to the Amazon River was far greater than we expected! Not only did we get to learn a lot about wildlife and Peruvian culture, but also enjoyed delicious fresh food and an exceptional service!

- Arianna B.

The trip exceeded my expectations. I chose Smithsonian because my friend and travelling companion had been with them on a trip down the Nile, but I had no idea how wonderful this trip would be.

- Smithsonian Journeys Traveler

The staff on the trip are the best I have ever encountered, and I have been to Antarctica, Galapagos, Alaska, in the Mediterranean.

- Joan S. & Peter T.

JOURNEYS DISPATCHES

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Aug 11 - 20, 2017 Departure
Pat Megonigal

Pat Megonigal

Pat Megonigal is Deputy Director at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. He is an ecosystem ecologist with interests in carbon and greenhouse gas cycling in wetlands and forests, particularly as they relate to global change. He is also the lead investigator of the Global Change Research Wetland, located within the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. This 70-hectare brackish marsh is home to several long-term experiments designed to predict what the future holds for coastal wetland ecosystems. Dr. Megonigal has published numerous scholarly articles and is a Fellow of the Ecological Society of America.

Oct 13 - 22, 2017 Departure
James Karr

James Karr

Jim Karr is professor emeritus of aquatic and fishery sciences with the University of Washington, as well as a former professor of biology and adjunct professor of civil and environmental engineering, environmental health, and public affairs. After earning a B.S. in fish and wildlife biology, and a Ph.D. in zoology, he traveled the globe’s tropical regions, studying forest birds in Central and South America, Africa, Southeast Asia, and New Guinea. As a professor at Purdue University, the University of Illinois, and Virginia Tech—and as deputy director of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama—Jim took his love of natural history beyond tropical ecology to the ecology of rivers, streams, and other fresh waters. He developed a tool, used worldwide, for looking at the biology of waters to assess their health. During the 1990s, Jim directed UW’s Institute for Environmental Studies, and his teaching and research broadened still more. Since then, he has focused on environmental policy and the ties binding human with nonhuman nature. Now, with more than 300 published works behind him, Jim continues to be a naturalist and teacher around the world with Smithsonian Journeys.

Mar 23 - Apr 1, 2018 Departure
Greg Shriver

Greg Shriver

Greg Shriver is Assistant Professor of Wildlife Ecology at the University of Delaware. He received his Ph.D. Environmental Forest Biology from the State University of New York, and his M.S. in Wildlife Conservation, from the University of Massachusetts. His research has included avian ecology and conservation, restoration ecology and the effects of sea-level rise on salt marsh birds. One of the highlights of Greg’s year is bringing his students to Costa Rica to study the conservation of tropical biodiversity. 

Apr 27 - May 6, 2018 Departure; May 18 - 27, 2018 Departure
Nina Zitani

Nina Zitani

Dr. Nina Zitani bonded with nature as a young child growing up in a small historic New Jersey town with giant trees and lots of bugs.  During her first field season as an entomology graduate student she fell in love with tropical forests and their myriad creatures at the Área de Conservación Guanacaste in Costa Rica. After working throughout Costa Rica for nearly a decade, she began teaching a field course in the upper Amazon basin of Ecuador.  She holds a Master of Science and Doctorate in systematic entomology from the University of Wyoming.  Her published research includes discovering 15 new insect species of Costa Rica.  Other scientists have named six new insect species in her honor.  Currently she resides in London, Ontario where she is an advocate for the conservation of biodiversity both locally and globally.  In 2011 she launched a popular website about biodiversity gardening, or gardening to restore biodiversity using 100% native plants.  Monarch butterflies, Giant Swallowtails, and pollinators of all shapes and sizes frequent her family’s garden each year.  She has been teaching people of all ages for nearly 25 years, and is a part-time Assistant Professor at the University of Western Ontario.  “Dr. Z”, as she is known to her students, relishes any opportunity to show scientists and non-scientists alike the astonishing biodiversity – plants, fungi and animals of all sorts – found in Neotropical forests.  

Jun 15 - 24, 2018 Departure
Jesus Rivas

Jesus Rivas

Jesus Rivas was born in Caracas, Venezuela and graduated with a degree in biology from the Universidad Central de Venezuela. His research interests include natural history, ethology, and conservation. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Tennessee in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and has been studying behavioral ecology and conservation of large tropical reptiles of the llanos of Venezuela. Most of his experience has been with green iguanas and green anacondas as well as the Orinoco crocodile, spectacled caiman, and green sea turtles. Rivas has taught courses in tropical ecology and is currently working at New Mexico Highlands University where he oversees the ecology lab while he continues his research and teaching. 

Aug 17 - 26, 2018 Departure
Ed Smith

Ed Smith

Traveling up the far reaches of the world's mightiest river offers superb views of forests stretching to the horizon, magnificent sunsets, and (to me, at least) the most delicious fresh air on the planet. But the real fun begins as we explore the details of this fascinating ecosystem and get to know the people who call this water-woven land home.

How does one adequately convey the kaleidoscopic variation on every theme of living thing found in this richest of tropical jungles? We'll see dozens of parrot species and other birdlife that defy imagination: tanagers, toucans, honey creepers, flycatchers, herons, caciques, barbets, egrets, jacamars, and tinamo, to name just a few (literally!). Far greater in variety than the birds are the fish –- we'll even try our hand at catching piranhas! Our time spent together will investigate the engines that power this system –- the myriad plants and invertebrates upon which all other life depends.

Although I've traveled the river many times as a Smithsonian Study Leader, my 'day job' is as a biologist in the Amazonia department of the National Zoo. There, we study and care for a few hundred Amazonian species of plants and animals -– yet our collection is a fraction of what we see on any given day during the Amazon Voyage.