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A Q&A with Expert Dr. Carol Reynolds

By | April 5, 2014
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Q: How do you view your role as a Smithsonian Journeys Expert?

A : My approach is three-fold. First, I want to help travelers realize their goals for the journey. Whether the fulfillment of a life-long dream or the next item on a “bucket list,” each Smithsonian journey has the power to enrich the traveler. Secondly, I want to be available as much as possible. Questions come up during formal presentations, of course. But more questions arise during coach rides to historical sites, at breakfast, or during quiet moments when we gaze from our river ship at the setting sun. Finally, I want us to have fun! A Smithsonian journey provides a 24/7 classroom for all of us. We are living our learning, and few things are more exciting than that.

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Dr. Carol Reynolds

Carol Reynolds weaves high energy, humor, and history into everything she does. After a career in music history at Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Professor Carol and husband Hank began designing multi-media fine arts curricula. Her unprecedented Discovering Music: 300 Years of Interaction in Western Music, Arts, History, and Culture (2009) has reached students across the world. In 2011 she released a cross-discipline course called Exploring America’s Musical Heritage. She is now creating a curriculum on the history of sacred music from Jewish Liturgy to 1600. Her research interests include German Romanticism and the musical court of Frederick the Great. She is fluent in German and Russian and maintains a home in Weimar. Dr. Reynolds is a staunch advocate of arts education at every stage of life and speaks regularly at educational conferences across the U.S.A pianist and organist, she is a popular speaker for organizations like The Dallas Symphony, Van Cliburn Concerts, The Dallas Opera, Tulsa Symphony, Kimball Museum, Fort Worth Opera, San Francisco Wagner Society, and the Davidson Institute.

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