Inside the Russian Space Program


Our behind-the-scenes journey of the Russian space program features a VIP viewing of the manned launch of a Soyuz spacecraft.

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 Russian cosmonauts  Moscow's Red Square, a World Heritage site  St. Basil's Cathedral in Moscow  The raising of the rocket ceremony  Preparing for the launch of a Soyuz rocket  A Soyuz rocket in flight  Spectators at a launch  A Russian cosmonaut waves to onlookers  The ISS Crew Press Conference at the Cosmonaut Hotel  Cold War Museum Bunker, Moscow  Yuri Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center, Star City
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Experts

Cathleen Lewis

Cathleen Lewis

May 24 - Jun 1, 2015

 

Cathleen Lewis is Curator of International Space Programs and Spacesuits at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Air and Space Museum, specializing in Soviet and Russian programs. Lewis has completed both bachelor’s and a master’s degrees in Russian and East European Studies at Yale University and completed her dissertation for her PhD in History, “The Red Stuff: A History of the Public and Material Culture of Early Human Spaceflight in the USSR, 1959-1968,” at George Washington University in 2008. Lewis curates Soviet and Russian components of Space Race exhibition at the Museum. She also has interests in the history of astrobiology and the history of blacks in aviation and spaceflight. Between 1998 - 2007 she chaired the Museum-wide Collections Committee. In the past, Lewis was chief curator in the development process for a new gallery, Dream to Fly. Her current research is on the history of the public and popular culture of Russian fascination with the idea of human spaceflight in the Soviet Union. She has written about the artifacts in the Smithsonian’s Soviet and Russian collection and has published articles comparing the Soviet and American approaches to exhibiting spaceflight during the Space Race and the history of film portrayals of spaceflight prior to Yuri Gagarin’s historic flight. She is also working on a comparative history of the development of American and Russian spacesuits.

 

David Mindell

May 24 - Jun 1, 2015

David A. Mindell, a historian and electrical engineer, is Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and Dibner Professor of the History of Engineering and Manufacturing at MIT. He is an expert on human/machine relationships in broad technical, social, and historical context. At MIT, Mindell teaches courses that combine engineering and the history of technology, including a doctoral seminar in engineering systems.  For the past fifteen years, Mindell has been combining engineering and historical research into the evolution humans’ relationships to machines. His most recent book, Digital Apollo: Human and Machine in Spaceflight (MIT Press, 2008) examined the computers, automation, and software in the Apollo moon landings their effects on human performance and won the Gardner Lasser award from the American institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He teaches “Engineering Apollo: The Moon Project as a Complex System,” which integrates technical, political, and operational perspectives on the history of space exploration. He has degrees in Literature and in Electrical Engineering from Yale University, and a doctorate in the history of technology from MIT.