int(125932) A Cruise of Japan | Smithsonian Journeys
 
The Golden Pavilion, Kyoto, Japan
The Golden Pavilion, Kyoto, Japan

A Cruise of JapanLand of the Rising Sun

May 7 - 20, 2014 (Call to Inquire)
Apr 10 - 23, 2015
Explore the arts and culture of Japan during a cruise of the Inland Sea and Sea of Japan aboard the Caledonian Sky
Starting at $9,990
Call 855-330-1542 or Ask Us a Question
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Mimi Hall Yiengpruksawan
May 7 - 20, 2014
Mimi Hall Yiengpruksawan is professor of history of art and director of undergraduate studies at Yale. She received her PhD in Japanese art from UCLA in 1988 and has taught at Yale since 1990. In her work Yiengpruksawan focuses on Buddhist art and iconography with an emphasis on political and social perspectives in the analysis of imagery and ritual. Since the early 1990s Yiengpruksawan has maintained a research and teaching commitment to modern Asian art. Among her publications are Buddhist Art Treasures from Nara (with Michael Cunningham and John Rosenfield, 1998); The Arts of Making Do: Catastrophe and Resilience in Kyoto Circa 1000; and Michinaga’s Peacocks: Regional Perspectives on Classical Japanese Art and Culture.

Helen Hardacre
May 7 - 20, 2014
Helen Hardacre is the Reischauer Institute Professor of Japanese Religions and Society at Harvard University. She teaches a variety of courses on Japanese religions, including early modern and contemporary Japanese religions, Shinto, and folk religion, and specialized seminars such as Shinto and the Arts, State Shinto, and the Ise Shrines. In the fall of 2013, she will teach a General Education course titled "Animated Spirituality," addressing the intersections of contemporary Japanese popular culture and religious life. She served as Director of the Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies (1995-98) and is a member of the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations. Hardacre earned her doctorate from the University of Chicago in 1980 and has done extended field study of contemporary Shinto, Buddhist religious organizations, and the religious life of Japan's Korean minority. Her current research projects include a book-length study of Shinto history.

Louisa McDonald
Apr 10 - 23, 2015
Aya Louisa McDonald, is an Associate Professor of Art History and Chair of the Art Department at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas specializing in Japanese art. She received her PhD in East Asian Art from Stanford University and did post-graduate studies in Japanese art history at Tokyo University. She wrote her doctoral dissertation on the gender distinctions in medieval Japanese narrative scroll painting. After a post-doc at Harvard University, where she was an Associate in Research at the Edwin O. Reischauer Institute for Japanese Studies, she taught in New England before joining the faculty at UNLV. McDonald’s scholarly interests range widely from French Japonisme to modern and contemporary Japanese art. Currently, her research is focused on the relationship between art and war, particularly the World War II war art of the Japanese artist Fujita Tsuguharu (1886-1968). She is co-editor of Art and War in Japan and its Empire: 1931-1960, an anthology of art historical essays, including her own, published in 2012 by Brill (Leiden) in the Japanese Visual Culture Series.