Posts Tagged ‘family tours’

Book of the week – Smithsonian Natural History

Thursday, June 23rd, 2011

Our book partner, Longitude Books, is always looking for new top reads for curious traveler.

This week, they’ve recommended you try Smithsonian Natural History, The Ultimate Visual Guide to Everything on Earth.

smithsonian natural historyEvery kingdom of life, from bacteria, plants and animals to the minerals and rocks that make up the Earth is featured in this stunning visual survey, just the thing you need to get you ready for your next Journey out into the world.

With more than 5,000 color images, this book, which celebrates the centennial of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. The first chapter introduces Earth, its geology and life-forms, followed by in-depth chapters on minerals, rocks, and fossils; microscopic life; plants; fungi; and animals, each with informative descriptions and rich images. Ever wanted to know more about the Mexican red-kneed tarantula? Then this is your book.

Wew have 40 itineraries focused on teaching you more about natural history. Click here to learn more.

Family Dinosaur Discovery

Monday, January 24th, 2011

 

Assisting at a fossil site

Your chance to assist at a fossil site comes July 30 - Aug 5, 2011, on our Family Dinosaur Discovery.

This July, our newest summer family vacation, Familly Dinosaur Discovery, includes a slew of western adventures from dinosaur excavations and rafting on Colorado River, to hiking in the Colorado National Monument and horseback riding. You’ll even get to prepare fossils in a professional lab.

But July’s still a few months away. Until then, you can check out the dinosaurs right from your computer, on Smithsonian magazine’s Dinosaur Tracking blog.

Dinosaurs at the Smithsonian

Tuesday, November 2nd, 2010
T-Rex at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History in Washington, DC

T. rex at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C.

Recently, 7-year-old Aidan Isenstadt of Elkridge, MD, found a dinosaur jawbone at Dinosaur Park in nearby Laurel, MD.  Since 2009, park officials have allowed the public to dig for fossils there; nine-year-old Gabrielle Bock also found a dinosaur tailbone there.

So what’s the best way to treat your own kids to some hands-0n discovery? Check our our brand-new Planet Earth and Beyond Smithsonian family adventure right here in Washington, DC. You and your kids (aged 9 to 12) can spend four days here at the Smithsonian, learning about science, nature, exploration, and discovery from Smithsonian’s scientists and experts.

Family Life in Ancient Egypt

Monday, August 16th, 2010
Enjoy riding camels with the whole family!

Enjoy riding camels with the whole family!

One of the most popular destination for Smithsonian travelers is Egypt. There’s something everyone finds intriguing about this ancient land—whether it’s history, culture, archaeology or artifacts that pique your interest most. So, given the love for this country, we’re celebrating Egypt Week at Smithsonian Journeys this week! Check back each day for more on Egypt. 

We’ll begin with the children of Ancient Egypt. All of us have experienced childhood, but children in ancient Egypt lived much differently than we do now. The ancient Egyptians defined roles sharply for small children, prepubescent kids, and adults with full responsibilities to society. The average life span of an Ancient Egyptian was about 40 years, so childhood ended at puberty and young Egyptians quickly learned their roles in society. By age 14, ancient Egyptians were considered adults and would have been involved in jobs, marriage, and children of their own.

For the typical Egyptian child, pets were a wonderful form of entertainment, including dogs, kittens, ducks, and pigeons. While wealthier children had access to dolls and a variety of other toys, most children learned from what was around them. Children who were not of the upper classes mirrored their parents roles in performing household chores (for girls), or working in the fields (for boys). These children did not attend school as we do today, but they did begin learning their family’s trade, as early as age four.

For royal children, education was taken seriously and included reading, writing and mathematics. Other wealthy boys might have trained to become scribes while attending temple schools or trained to become army officers. Girls, however, did not attend school, but many did learn to read and write.

When you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up?

Learn more about being a kid in ancient and modern Egypt on our Egyptian Family Odyssey!

An Egyptian Family Odyssey

Tuesday, July 13th, 2010
Enjoy riding camels with the whole family!

Enjoy riding camels with the whole family!

There is something exotic and adventurous about Egypt. Every child knows that in a desert somewhere in the North African desert, there are gigantic pyramids, “cursed” tombs, and an abundance of mummies. Exploring Egypt as a child provides an experience that lasts a lifetime, possibly resulting in your child becoming an archaeologist, historian, or diplomat.

You might not expect your mummy-obsessed child to want to  be a SCUBA diver,  particularly in the desert land of Egypt. But in locations like Alexandria and along the Nile River, archaeologists and environmentalists need to go underwater to do their research.

For environmentalists, there is the concern about rising sea levels, which would affect Egypt’s coastal cities and communities along the Nile river. For archaeologists, Egypt’s many shipwrecks and submerged buildings are of great interest, as they provide a record of Egyptian nautical history, as well as many stone and metal artifacts.  These kinds of materials do not deteriorate easily, and while underwater, objects can be preserved from wind, weather and war.

So even if your child wants to be a certified SCUBA diver, you may find yourself visiting her in Egypt someday.

Have you been to Egypt? What was your favorite highlight?

Take the whole family to Egypt! Our Egyptian Family Odyssey has dates available in 2010 and 2011.