Posts Tagged ‘Civil War’

The 150th Anniversary of the Civil War

Thursday, July 28th, 2011

This year is the 150th Anniversary of the Civil War, which began at Bull Run in Manassas, Virginia early on the morning of July 21, 1861.

The Smithsonian is honoring the sesquicentennial of the Civil War in numerous ways, some of them listed here:

Our official Civil War 150th web experience is located here and includes several online exhibitions, educational resources, and links to podcasts, events, blogs, and more.

We’ve also honored the occasion with a special Smithsonian Book – The Civil War – A Visual History.

We’re partnering with the Chautauqua Institution to bring you a week of Civil War programming with leading Civil War scholars at the historic campus in western New York State.

On our Journey through Hallowed Ground, follow the Civil War from Charlottesville to Gettysburg with Civil War expert Study Leader A. Wilson Greene, Executive Director of the National Museum of the Civil War Solider.

Join us next June for an exclusive tour of Civil War sites here in the Washington, DC, area on War Comes to Washington – 1862, where you’ll also discover the unique role the Smithsonian played during the War.

On a lighter note, vote for your favorite display of Civil War facial hair and learn more about the historic contestants in our contest.

Photo: Lincoln at Gettysburg

Tuesday, August 25th, 2009
Statue of Lincoln at Gettysburg National Park

Statue of Lincoln at Gettysburg National Park

 

When asked why it’s so important to walk the battlefields to understand our history, Ed Bearss, Civil War Historian and perennial favorite Smithsonian Journeys Study Leader, puts it this way:

To understand what happened, you must know the lay of the land. To know the configuration of the land, where the high ground and the low ground is, where there are woods and open fields, what type of cultural features existed (houses, orchards, roads, etc), and how this affected what the officers planned and what they saw. More important, the lay of the land influenced the rank and file, whether they lived or died, and for the Generals, whether they won or lost.

Click here for more of our interview with Ed, and here for more information on our Civil War tours.